Children’s Christmas Fat Quarter Skirt Redux

Still time to stitch up some Christmas fashion for the little Girls on your list.  They’ll love you for it.

All it requires is a package of Christmas print fat quarters.  It’s prepackaged so eliminates the fabric selection dilemma; how easy is that!

Christmas Fashion from Fat Quarters

FAT QTR
At a Christmas in July sale, the Fat Quarters on an end cap caught my eye and triggered a memory of a Fat Quarter Toddler Skirt from Pinterest.  Couldn’t quite remember the details (that’s why there is Pinterest) but knew/thought my two Girl Grands would need some Christmas fashion.  Whether they will wear it remains to be seen, as apparently, definite fashion ideas are bred in with all Girls from birth.

Bought two ‘on sale’ Fat Quarters packets with four cotton fabrics 18″ X 21″.  A Fat Quarter is a quilter’s term for a quarter of a 36″ X 44″ piece of  fabric.

Diagram below courtesy of Janet Wickell.

Fat Quarters are 1/4th of a yard of quilting cotton

Luckily, remembered them in the stash and proceeded to cut and stitch two of them in three days–with time out for nail appointment, a meeting, etc.  This also included time calculating tier measurements.

Here are the two finished skirts–size 4 and 6.  Had a package of Christmas Tree buttons on hand so added them to the skirt

Tree button tacks up overskirt to reveal tulle ruffle

Skirt 2

One 'tree' tacks up overskirt to reveal tulle ruffle

Turns out the skirts look nothing like the Fat Quarter Toddler Skirt (below), but did have just a vague memory which happened to be a tiered skirt.  Now where did that come from?

TODDLER FAT QUARTER SKIRT http://www.lifeincleveland.com/2010/06/3-fat-quarters-2-toddler-skirts.html

Once I decided on the order of the fabrics, each fabric was cut to size per the calculations below.  The cut strips were joined into a circle then gathered and stitched to the preceding tier using a 1/2″ SA (seam allowance).

A tier width of one and a half times the previous tier width is minimum but that is all the fabric I had–none left for matching.  In the end, it turned out to be plenty of fullness.

Divide the finished skirt length by the number of tiers you want in the skirt; I did four   tiers.  This is the length of each tier; total length of all tiers equals finished length of skirt

1.  Tier 1=1 tier length + 1 SA + 1.25″ elastic (3/4″) casing allowance by hip circumference plus 4″

2.  Tier 2= 1 tier length + 2 SA by 1.5 X width of tier 1

3.  Tier 3= 1 tier length + 2 SA by 1.5 X width of tier 2

4. Tier 4= 1 tier length + 2 SA  by 1.5 X width of tier 3

A tulle ruffle was added under the last tier to add fluff, and to make the skirt more appealing to the Princess Grands.

I recommend using nylon tulle as it is softer than netting, and cover the raw edges as the gathered edge can catch in tights and is rough on bare knees.  Serging provides thread coverage for the gathered edge; hem edge does not need finishing.

Inside of finished skirt

Non-roll 3/4″ elastic is used in the casing. Cut it 4″ shorter than waist measurement.

Wrong side of elastic casing

 

This entry was posted in FIBER FASHION FUN, GREAT IDEA and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments Please